The TRUST Blog
Blog Home All Blogs

Lifting the Next Generation of Women

Posted By Connie Delaney, U of M School of Nursing, Tuesday, July 3, 2018

Do you recall the first time someone helped elevate you in your career? Maybe the moment was quiet, serendipitous, a call-out in front of senior leaders, mentor support, a simple card. We see in our own lives, and those of our colleagues, many moments and events that serve as opportunities to lift up innovation, well-being, our common humanity. We too are committed to lifting up the next generation of women leaders. Consider ways to elevate others:

  • Share Your Story. Your stories enable others to learn how to envision and achieve these roles themselves. Share your story during networking, mentoring or presentation opportunities.
  • Give Positive Feedback. Be generous giving positive feedback openly and publicly. Be specific about what you observed or heard, and what the impact was. When we celebrate great behavior, it is often copied and repeated by the individual and others.
  • Teach. Teaching provides deeper awareness, knowledge and skills, and can boost the careers of up-and-coming leaders. Engage in various seminars, programs and advanced education classes.
  • Listen. Welcome opportunities to be deeply present and listen to others. Listening is mutually gifting — we tend to respond more when we are heard. You will likely enhance your empathy as you listen to others who are different from you.
  • Be a Mentor. A mentor has a great ability to advance the health care careers of women and enhance their leadership skills. Establish a relationship with a mentee and share the leadership traits you observe. Listen to her career aspirations and share advice. Challenge her to be bold and innovative. These close mentor and mentee relationships often facilitate lifelong learning and connections.
  • Shine the Spotlight on Others. Provide the opportunity for others to be lifted up. Give praise for others on social media where the reach is large. Let others present to senior leaders, lead a collaborative group or pitch a new idea. Be the person who opens the gate to new opportunities.
  • Create Connections. Advancing in your career and transforming health care is frequently a combination of skill and connections. Create connections for future leaders by introducing them to others in the field. Enlist the reach of social media. Pay it forward — today’s introduction could be tomorrow’s guiding force for you.
  • Ensure Women on Interview Panels. Support women serving on interview panels. The presence of women on interview panels expands a candidate’s ability to envision a career path at an organization where women leaders are visible and engaged.
  • Advance Service of Women on Boards. Promote and nominate women for board positions. The leadership of women on boards expands women’s contributions to strategy and decision-making. Engage with the Women’s Health Leadership TRUST initiative to advance women for board positions.
  • Encourage Membership in Female-Focused Organizations. Encourage women of all ages to become active members of women-focused groups, like the Women’s Health Leadership TRUST, with a mission to advance the careers of women.

The elevation of others is an opportunity to change their lives, and your own life as well. The more we lift each other, the more we rise. Let’s continue to rise together through the TRUST.

Connie White Delaney currently serves as TRUST President, and Professor and Dean at the School of Nursing at the University of Minnesota. Delaney holds degrees in nursing and mathematics, adult health nursing, educational administration, and informatics. Delaney’s work is expanding connections, collaborations, integrative informatics, and social structures which advance co-discovery of solutions that transform health and education systems.

Tags:  mentoring  next generation of women leaders  women on boards  Women's Health Leadership TRUST 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Learning Is Endless and Transformative

Posted By Connie Delaney, U of M School of Nursing, Tuesday, June 5, 2018

Maya Angelou is quoted as saying, “I’ve learned that I still have a lot to learn.” Isn’t this true for all of us? We engage in learning through formal education systems resulting in degrees and certifications, informal learning through reading or attending professional development programs, and learning through living life. Learning in its fullness — mind, body and spirit — fosters transformation of self, others and the communities with which we engage.

The synergy among each of us, others and the world invites continuous growth. While we each see areas in ourselves for growth, we also depend on others to show us what we cannot see, to be mirrors showing us opportunities. T. S. Eliot reminds us of the cyclical nature of learning noting, “We shall not cease from exploration, and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time.” This unbroken learning invites us to co-create the future through new explorations, new partnerships and renewed insights.

A love of learning can build knowledge, inspire hope, generate confidence, spark innovation and enhance wisdom. Learning is a conscious act. As Abigail Adams noted, “Learning is not attained by chance, it must be sought for with ardor and diligence.”

Lifelong learning and education is one of the TRUST’s four core pillars. Through education we can gain knowledge, new attitudes, skills and experiences necessary to nurture our personal self, professional self and their integration. We invite you to engage in the TRUST to support your learning journey; consider these examples of benefits:

  • Professional and Personal Development — The TRUST offers professional and personal development opportunities that engage participants in cutting-edge topics of importance to women leaders in health care. Our event calendar includes up-to-date programs of interest such as our Special Programs and Pinnacle Leader Dinners.
  • Annual Meeting — Our signature Annual Meeting, held each fall, is scheduled on September 27. This is a wonderful event to share and receive wisdom from fellow women leaders in health care and hear an inspiring presentation. We welcome keynote Cindy Kent, former President and General Manager of the 3M Infection Prevention Division. Cindy will share her insights as a health care veteran with more than 20 years in the industry. Moreover, we will celebrate the TRUST’s accomplishments of the past year and discover what is coming in the year ahead.
  • Accelerate! Mentoring — The TRUST mentoring program is a unique learning opportunity. The newly redesigned, stronger and more meaningful program will be launched in September.
  • TRUST Communications — Blogs, newsletters and social media are regular avenues used to share thoughtful information, data and trends as well as third party articles on topics related to TRUST pillars, our mission and our vision. We learn from each other, and we invite you to like, comment on and share our communications and social media posts.

Learning is your personal journey. Your passion for learning fosters your own transformation as well as that of others. The TRUST is a community of women leaders that creates opportunities to network within the health care industry, offers programs designed to enhance leadership skills, provides educational offerings, and advances the health care careers of women. The TRUST is here to inspire and support you. Most significantly, the TRUST offers the gift of listening to one another in support of learning and transformation. Enjoy the journey.

Connie White Delaney currently serves as TRUST President, and Professor and Dean at the School of Nursing at the University of Minnesota. Delaney holds degrees in nursing and mathematics, adult health nursing, educational administration, and informatics. Delaney’s work is expanding connections, collaborations, integrative informatics, and social structures which advance co-discovery of solutions that transform health and education systems.

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Blaze the Trail and Lead with Vision

Posted By Connie Delaney, U of M School of Nursing, Tuesday, May 1, 2018
Updated: Monday, April 30, 2018

Trailblazer. According to the Merriam-Webster dictionary the term trailblazer first appeared in print in 1908 to define “one that blazes a trail to guide others.” Though the term didn’t appear broadly until that date, women have been blazing trails in health care, transforming health, and distinguishing themselves in their respective health careers for quite some time. The path along the way has included challenges. Women trailblazers throughout history have endured, in fact welcomed the challenges with a passion for transformation.

Elizabeth Blackwell, MD, was the first woman to receive a medical degree in the United States; she was courageous and unwavering in following her passion. Her acceptance to Geneva Medical College in New York in 1847 was “deemed by the student body as an administrative practical joke.”1 Blackwell later went on to found the New York Infirmary for Indigent Women and Children in 1857, which stood for more than 100 years, and helped establish the U.S. Sanitary Commission in 1861 under Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War.

Imagine the challenges that awaited Dr. Jean Harris, a distinguished Minnesotan, who was born in the segregated South and became the first African-American graduate of the Medical College of Virginia. During her career she advised five presidents on health policy, was a celebrated corporate and public health leader, and Eden Prairie’s first woman mayor. Her remarkable life and achievements speak to the full promise of America and underscore the importance of continuing to inspire leaders and others to shape a world of harmony, peace, and dignity. Dr. Harris’ vision and leadership made her one of the TRUST’s most respected members and led to the TRUST establishing the Jean Harris Award in her honor.

Dr. Jean Harris and other women trailblazers in health care paved the way for deeper representation of women throughout all areas of the industry. The inclusivity and awareness of many views and experiences of the world and living expand the possibilities for health and a vibrant health care industry.

Trailblazers forge a path – big or small – to lead with vision and honor the call to transcend challenges on the path of bold transformation. Trailblazers courageously persevere, and welcome risk in the face of uncertainty. They continuously collaborate and surround themselves with others who make each other stronger. These are traits shared by our very own TRUST trailblazers who have earned the honor of the Jean Harris Award or the 21st Century Pinnacle Leader Award. This year’s recipients, Paula Hart and Patsy Riley, have each uniquely demonstrated what it means to be a woman trailblazer in health care. As President and CEO of Volunteers of America – Minnesota and Wisconsin, Paula Hart has sustained the VOA’s 122-year legacy as a health and human services organization with a mission to help those served gain self-reliance, dignity and hope. Patricia (Patsy) Riley, recently retired Senior Vice President and Chief Government Officer, oversaw Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota’s government health program business, was responsible for more than $4 billion in revenue, and was instrumental in shaping the organization’s diversity, inclusion and health equity initiatives.

TRUST members are leading health care organizations in an increasing variety of roles. Together, TRUST members are bringing additional perspectives and views to the health care industry and changing perceptions of what and how we transform health and health care. While we've made steady, significant progress for which we can celebrate, there are trails yet to be blazed. Let's continue to join together in community and empower the journeys of our future trailblazers.

Sources: 1 Biography.com

Connie White Delaney currently serves as TRUST President, and Professor and Dean at the School of Nursing at the University of Minnesota. Delaney holds degrees in nursing and mathematics, adult health nursing, educational administration, and informatics. Delaney’s work is expanding connections, collaborations, integrative informatics, and social structures which advance co-discovery of solutions that transform health and education systems.

Tags:  21st Century Pinnacle Leader Award  Jean Harris Award  Patsy Riley  Paula Hart  Women's Health Leadership TRUST 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Power of Courage and Gratitude

Posted By Connie Delaney, U of M School of Nursing, Thursday, April 12, 2018
Untitled Document

The Forum lifted up powerful and inspiring stories of courage of Minnesota women in health care. When we gathered on April 11 we came from all sectors of Minnesota’s health care community, representing diverse career stages and leadership paths. Our common mission that evening was to celebrate women leaders who found the courage within to tackle risk, open themselves to vulnerability, and in that journey transform health and health care. Our common mission increased our awareness, engagement, and liberation through experiencing the potential of an integrated community dedicated to transformation through bold leadership.

The 2018 TRUST Courage Awards celebrated 20 incredible women who showed grit and determination, dared without fear and boldly transformed health and health care in remarkable ways. We are grateful that these courageous women in Minnesota health care chose courage, moved through fear and transcended challenges to inspire countless other women in the industry. Congratulations to the 2018 Courage Award recipients: Khadija Ali, Global Language and Staffing Connections; Jane Anderson, University of Minnesota School of Nursing; Julie Burton, ModernWell; Sara Criger, Mercy Hospital and Allina Health; Jill Davies, GeneMatters; Gina Tallarico Hall, HealthPartners; Lee Jones, Rebiotix, Inc.; Barbara Jordan, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine; Molly Joseph, UnitedHealthcare Global and UnitedHealth Group; Marie Manthey, Creative Health Care Management; Elizabeth Murphy, Be the Match; Leslie Pitt Schneider, Project Lolo; Jen Rosetta, Allina Health; Uzma Samadani, HCMC; Lisa Schafer, Teva Pharmaceuticals; Trisha Stark, Clinical Psychologist, Private Practice; Martha Turner, American Nurses Association Center for Ethics & Human Rights; Kari Willey, HealthPartners; Ghita Worcester, UCare; and Yvonne Ybarra, Be the Match.

We also celebrated and learned from Forum keynote Ann Bancroft – an exemplar of courage and transformation. Her Minnesota roots helped her link the wisdom of nature and humanity and find the courage to achieve greatness as an explorer, teacher, author and philanthropist. We are thankful Ann shared her stories of courage and breaking down barriers to inspire the Forum audience and motivate women and girls around the world to unleash the power of their dreams.

The evening celebrated the Jean Harris Award presented to Paula Hart and the 21st Century Pinnacle Leader Award to Patricia “Patsy” Riley. Paula, President and CEO of Volunteers of America – Minnesota and Wisconsin, and a past TRUST President, was recognized for advancing health care, embodying Jean Harris’s legacy of  inspiring leaders and others to shape a world with hope, honor, and dignity, and exemplifying the vision of the TRUST. Patsy, recently retired Senior Vice President and Chief Government Officer, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota, was honored as an outstanding leader who has paved the way for change and transformation in health care. Thank you Paula and Patsy for being exemplary health care leaders and, lifting up women in leadership; and congratulations on your achievements!

And we thank you to our sponsors whose essential support empowered the TRUST in offering a stellar evening of learning and networking for more than 900 attendees. These companies showcase the ongoing leadership in health care that makes Minnesota’s commitment to health renowned on the global level. The TRUST is deeply grateful for all of our Forum sponsors!

My final thank you is to the Forum Committee: Carol Kraft, Theresa Pesch, Dee Thibodeau, Aliza Bach, Christine Bent, Monica Engel, Cheri Jacoby, Kate Lanners, Diane Nanstad, Leslie Parran, Amy Ronneberg, Patricia Salkowicz, Kandace Schuft, Janet Stacey, Sherri Walsh, Mary Welsh, and Candee Wolf. This committee’s unwavering work and heart-driven joy brought the Forum theme to life and lifted up courageous women in health care.

I trust that each of you will accept opportunities to embrace courage, determination and inspiration to manifest your dreams and to transform Minnesota health and health care, planetary health, and most significantly cultivate exciting new directions.

Connie currently serves as TRUST President, and Professor and Dean at the School of Nursing at the University of Minnesota. Delaney holds degrees in nursing and mathematics, adult health nursing, educational administration, and informatics. Delaney’s work is expanding connections, collaborations, integrative informatics, and social structures which advance co-discovery of solutions that transform health and education systems.

 Attached Thumbnails:

Tags:  21st Century Pinnacle Leader Award  Ann Bancroft  Jean Harris Award  TRUST Courage Awards  TRUST Forum 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

A Time for Renewal and Inspiration

Posted By Connie Delaney, U of M School of Nursing, Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Spring is drawing near and it’s a great season for reaffirming, rededicating and reimagining. This is a season of renewed optimism and an ideal time to open up to new ways of thinking and feeling.

Spring is also a sure sign the TRUST Forum is right around the corner. This year’s Forum will be held on April 11. The Forum brings inspiration, renewed confidence, and rededication to the spirit and passion of the TRUST’s support of women leaders in health care. These themes are often echoed in the statements of those who attend the Forum. Here’s what a few people had to say about the TRUST and our 2017 Forum:

  • “I love the camaraderie. I love the inspiration.”
  • “There’s no place other than right here in Minnesota that has a women’s health leadership Forum like we do.”
  • “The Forum is a great way to recognize women and to inspire.”
  • “It’s a superb networking event to meet women from all sectors of health care throughout Minnesota.”
  • “These are pivotal years in health care and the Forum is the perfect place to address this and help share the value of the TRUST.”

It’s so heartwarming to hear women speak of how the Forum inspired them to act. We bring the Forum to you each year because we know it can make a positive impact in the lives of women leaders and spark the innovation and courage to transform the health care industry.

I anticipate this year’s Forum will again inspire action in ways currently unknown. Our theme this year is courage, which we talked about on this blog in January. Courage expands our awareness, our ability to be transparent, our vision to transform, and most significantly, the audacity to act.

The TRUST believes strongly in supporting women leaders in health care to move through fear, choose courage, and transcend challenges. That’s why the 2018 Forum will recognize 20 Courageous Women in Minnesota Health Care who found the courage within to tackle risk and vulnerability with grit and determination. We are excited to celebrate these women who discovered the power of “we” and partnering, and gain inspiration from their courageous achievements. The 20 Courageous Women will be announced on March 9 via the TRUST website and that day’s issue of the Minneapolis-St. Paul Business Journal.

The TRUST is overjoyed to have Ann Bancroft as keynote speaker for the 2018 Forum. I have had the opportunity to meet Bancroft; she is truly dynamic and engaging! At the Forum, she will share her insights as a teacher, author and explorer who has repeatedly demonstrated vulnerability, grit and courage through her incredible expeditions. The TRUST recently talked with Bancroft and we were a bit surprised to hear she doesn’t view herself to be courageous. You can find the TRUST’s Q&A with Bancroft in the February 23 issue of the Minneapolis-St. Paul Business Journal and on our website.

I hope you will register for the Forum as an individual or as a table of 10, and join us April 11 as we celebrate courageous women and connect with women leaders in health care. One final note on spring — the first day of spring, March 20, is also the International Day of Happiness. May your spring be filled with joy, gratitude, and renewed inspiration!
 
Connie currently serves as TRUST President, and Professor and Dean at the School of Nursing at the University of Minnesota. Delaney holds degrees in nursing and mathematics, adult health nursing, educational administration, and informatics. Delaney’s work is expanding connections, collaborations, integrative informatics, and social structures which advance co-discovery of solutions that transform health and education systems.

Tags:  Ann Bancroft  courage  courageous leadership  TRUST Forum  Women's Health Leadership TRUST 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

The Power of a Personal Brand

Posted By Connie Delaney, U of M School of Nursing, Thursday, February 1, 2018
Untitled Document

You have a personal brand, whether or not you consciously set out to build one. Your brand is one of your most important assets and it is essential to shape and nurture it. Powerful personal brands have numerous benefits, such as leadership opportunities, greater credibility, higher compensation, more clients, added recognition, rewarding partnerships, and most significantly, impact on the health of your community.

Defining Your Brand

Your personal brand is at the intersection of how you see yourself and how others perceive you. A brand is the value, emotion and reputation an audience attributes to you. In other words, your personal brand is what people say about you when you’re not around. Although you cannot define your own brand, you can influence your brand.

Brand alignment occurs when how you see yourself and how others perceive you are similar. Brands can change as we gain new skills and grow both professionally and personally. There are opportunities to shape and build your brand throughout your career.

Building a Successful Brand

Your brand is constructed like a building – from the ground up. The strength and sustainability of your brand needs your attention and action. Words and actions influence your brand. Are your experiences with others positively building your brand?
Consider these three key components to building a successful personal brand:

  • Authenticity – Be who you are. To be who you are asks you to know who you are. Take time to discern who you are now and who you want to be by gaining greater awareness, clarity and intention. Your brand depends on it. Be true to your True North. Be genuine, be who you are.
  • Visibility – It is nearly impossible for others to form an opinion of you if no one sees you or hears from you. You can enhance your visibility via your presence at work and industry events, publishing articles, speaking at programs and volunteering. Writing on social media channels, such as LinkedIn, is also a way to enhance your visible profile.
  • Consistency – Walk your talk to ensure a consistent brand experience. Ensure consistency of your thoughts, actions and words to build a successful brand that is easy for others to ascertain.

Our TRUST Forum event on April 11 is a great place to showcase your personal brand and build upon it. Treat your personal brand with care and recognize it for the essential asset it is. The work you put into your brand now will pay dividends for years to come.

Connie currently serves as TRUST President, and Professor and Dean at the School of Nursing at the University of Minnesota. Delaney holds degrees in nursing and mathematics, adult health nursing, educational administration, and informatics. Delaney’s work is expanding connections, collaborations, integrative informatics, and social structures which advance co-discovery of solutions that transform health and education systems.

Tags:  personal brand  TRUST Forum  Women's Health Leadership TRUST 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Lessons in Courage: Follow Your Heart

Posted By Connie Delaney, U of M School of Nursing, Tuesday, January 2, 2018
Untitled Document

"Courage is the most important of all virtues, because without it we can't practice any other virtue with consistency." - Maya Angelou

Courage. It’s the theme for this year’s TRUST Forum event on April 11 and it’s a topic we talk about frequently within TRUST programs and communications. Why? We believe strongly in supporting women in health care to move through fear to find their courage to boldly transform the industry.

Definitions of courage often include persevering in the face of challenges and following one’s heart to stand up for what is right despite fear and risk. This is apt because the word courage comes from the French root coeur, which means heart. The heart is our spiritual core, closely linked to the mind, together providing wisdom. The link between the head and the heart is apparent every time our fight or flight drive is engaged. It is at that point we call on courage to stand up or stand down. Many times, the boldest, more courageous move is to take a step back to deescalate a perilous situation.

Courage is woven throughout our lives. At its core the courage to know and be who we uniquely are is ongoing. Courage expands our awareness, our ability to be transparent, and our vision to transform.

Our courage comes from within despite not always feeling bold or brave. It has been said that what you yearn for is who you are. If you yearn to be bold, it doesn’t mean you lack boldness; rather, you have not yet reached your full potential for it. Mary Anne Radmacher sums up this idea of courage by stating: “Courage doesn’t always roar. Sometimes courage is the little voice at the end of the day that says I’ll try again tomorrow.”

The TRUST is here to support women to realize courage comes from within. The TRUST exists to support women leaders in health care and create a collaborative force of women who share insights and expertise to lead within the industry. I hope you’ll join us in sharing your stories of leading courageously in health care.

I also encourage you to join us at the Forum in April as we learn from and honor 20 courageous women in Minnesota health care and hear from Ann Bancroft, one of the world’s preeminent polar explorers and an internationally recognized leader. Ann has used her courage to explore the unknown and to inspire women and girls around the world to unleash the power of their dreams.

As we start a new year, may you have the strength to unleash the full potential of your courage for today, tomorrow and the future of health care.

Connie Delaney currently serves as TRUST President, and Professor and Dean at the School of Nursing at the University of Minnesota. Connie holds degrees in nursing and mathematics, adult health nursing, educational administration, and informatics. Connie’s work is expanding connections, collaborations, integrative informatics, and social structures which advance co-discovery of solutions that transform health and education systems.

Tags:  Courage  Maya Angelou  TRUST Forum 2018  women leaders in health care 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

How to Build and Enhance a Powerful Network

Posted By Connie Delaney, U of M School of Nursing, Thursday, November 30, 2017
Untitled Document

We’re in a season of giving thanks, recommitting to a life anchored in gratitude, and extending warm wishes as 2017 nears its end and 2018 starts to dawn on the horizon. It’s a time for numerous holiday gatherings filled with friends and colleagues, old and new, as well as a time to discern our wishes for the New Year. It is an ideal time to continue building or enhancing your professional network.

Your professional network of peers can help you learn more about the health care industry, new career paths, and enhance partnerships to make a bold impact on health and health care. Here are a few suggestions to help you build and expand your network.

Be a connector. Introduce people who can enhance one another. This can be done easily and quickly while attending events or through LinkedIn messages. People remember those who listen, are available, and help them. Your kindness will be reciprocated in the future.

Ask for connections. While you’re helping connect others, don’t forget to ask for connections. This could be as simple as asking, “Who else might I talk to in the health care (nursing, operations, finance, HR, IT, marketing, etc.) space?” These colleague-of-a-colleague connections can be very strong and carry extra credibility.

Look for the win-win. Give assistance to others as often as you ask for help. It’s a two-way street and networking should be about creating win-win situations of mutual benefit.

Leverage social networks. LinkedIn is the ideal professional social network to stay connected with people you meet. It’s also a vibrant pathway to research organizations you may want to work for and identify those who can help you connect to others. Keep your LinkedIn profile up-to-date as it is often the first place people go to learn more about you. Feel free to connect with me on my LinkedIn profile. And be sure to join the TRUST's LinkedIn group.

Join professional organizations. Energetic professional organizations, such as the TRUST, are a wonderful way to meet others, partner, and create impact. The TRUST provides numerous opportunities to meet women in health care who share your professional interests and goals.

Attend professional events. The TRUST offers events of all topics and sizes so you have the ability to network with large groups or in more casual small group settings.

Networking involves reciprocal relationships. Help others in your network with new introductions and job leads, and you’ll find others will do the same for you. The most vigorous networks are nourished and fostered over time with generous amounts of tending to your field of connections. You enrich your long-term success when you create deeper connections.

Connie currently serves as TRUST President, and Professor and Dean at the School of Nursing at the University of Minnesota. Delaney holds degrees in nursing and mathematics, adult health nursing, educational administration, and informatics. Delaney’s work is expanding connections, collaborations, integrative informatics, and social structures which advance co-discovery of solutions that transform health and education systems.

Tags:  LinkedIn  networking  relationship building 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Bold Leadership: Thinking Bravely, Leading Confidently

Posted By Connie Delaney, U of M School of Nursing, Friday, November 3, 2017
Untitled Document

The Women’s Health Leadership TRUST’s mission is to support women leaders in health care, and we continually aim to support our members grow as the most transformative leaders they can be. Recently, we’ve heard members tell us they want the TRUST to support them to not only become leaders, but BOLD leaders. We’ve listened and are taking action by adding related topics to our strong programming line-up and honoring courageous women in health care at the 2018 Forum.

What does it mean to be a bold leader? A bold person is defined as taking risks; being brave, confident and courageous. A leader who is bold, confident and courageous chooses to act in a situation that involves risk or fear, and yes, vulnerability. She follows the integrated heart and mind to lift up health, and radiates fortitude as well as vulnerability to persevere in the face of challenges even when she can’t control the outcome. A bold leader thinks bravely and acts confidently to expand horizons, move beyond the familiar, and envision a future of health and well-being.

Sometimes boldness and confidence come naturally, other times it is a skill to be enhanced through increased mindfulness, intentionality and action. So, how can women move forward as bold leaders, even if it doesn’t come naturally? Here are a few suggestions no matter where you are on your journey.

  • Lead Authentically from Your True North. Determine who you are based on your values and sources of insight and satisfaction in your life. Your leadership will be authentic and confident when you’re true to your True North.
  • Take Confident Action. Share your insights even if they differ from the views of others. Get involved with projects outside of your comfort zone. Talk/listen to a stranger at a networking event. Practice creates more confidence, so aim to take one confident action a week.
  • Talk with Bold Leaders. Bold leaders are seldom shy about sharing their experiences with others. Talk to women you view as courageous and confident, and ask them to share their insights for growing as a bold leader.
  • Share Information. The most confident leaders share information and wisdom with others rather than amass it and use it in a short-sighted attempt for power.
  • Tell Stories. Confident leaders tell stories with impact and they weave these into their meetings, presentations and day-to-day conversations. Sharing and listening to stories are a bold way to engage with your audiences and help drive home messages.
  • Be Present; Demonstrate Confident Body Language. Body language can instantly demonstrate confidence, or a lack thereof. Engage through authentic eye contact and expressions with others.
  • Use Your Voice. Be mindful of the way you communicate verbally. Allow your energy to flow.
  • Prepare Comments. There is almost always an opportunity to prepare comments even in situations that may seem spontaneous. Think about what you want to say, then say it and stop. Allow silence to speak.

We all have something to share and to learn about being transformative leaders. Live your boldness daily. The Women’s Health Leadership TRUST is here to support you on your bold journey!

Connie currently serves as TRUST President, and Professor and Dean at the School of Nursing at the University of Minnesota. Delaney holds degrees in nursing and mathematics, adult health nursing, educational administration, and informatics. Delaney’s work is expanding connections, collaborations, integrative informatics, and social structures which advance co-discovery of solutions that transform health and education systems.

Sources:
Forbes, “How to Communicate Like a Confident Leader,” 5/10/17, http://bit.ly/2xbevq7
Inc., “7 Things Really Bold People Do,” 4/4/14, http://on.inc.com/2yGGcLh

Tags:  bold leaders  courageous leadership  women leaders 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Reflections and Focus for a New TRUST Year

Posted By Connie Delaney, U of M School of Nursing, Thursday, October 19, 2017
Untitled Document

I am honored to serve as the Women’s Health Leadership TRUST President and join the Board of numerous strong, stellar women leaders in the health care industry: Monica Engel, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota; Theresa Pesch, Children’s Health Care Foundation/Children’s Minnesota; Chris Bent, Allina Health Group; Amy Ronneberg, National Marrow Donor Program/Be the Match; Leslie Bodell, Optum; Julie Dekker, Fulcrum Health; Amy Dewane, HealthPartners; Sharon Gabrielson, Mayo Clinic; Sheri Henck, Medtronic; Beth Honkomp, CentraCare Health System; Ellyn Hosch, Prime Therapeutics; Jana Johnson, formerly of Medica; Stefanie Lenway, Opus College of Business at the University of St. Thomas; Leslie McDonnell, 3M’s Critical & Chronic Care Solutions Division; Nancy McMorran, DeCare Dental; Allison O’Connor, Fathom Consulting; Dee Thibodeau, Charter Solutions; and Mary Welsh, UnitedHealth Group.

Join me in expressing our gratitude to Theresa Pesch, Immediate Past President of the TRUST. The TRUST was fortunate to have Theresa’s influence and strong leadership on the TRUST Board and organization. It has been a pleasure to work closely with her over the last year.

The Board of Directors met recently to define and refine our priorities for 2018 and reaffirm the TRUST’s mission “to support women leaders in health care” and vision “to be a collaborative force of dynamic women in health care, aligned to share insights, expertise and trusted knowledge to lead within the industry.”

Our full plan for the year is very detailed with priorities to empower the membership through support from each of our committees. Here are some highlights that the Board, in partnership with all members, believes will have a transformative impact and lift up the collaborative force of dynamic women in health care in the year ahead.

  • Take TRUST Programs to a higher level. We plan to expand new, edgy content, responding to member feedback valuing thought leader and other strong programming focused on our turbulent health care market environment and opportunities to foster transformation.
  • Strengthen our value proposition. We are committed to advancement of women in health care and welcome thoughts and insights to enhance our value proposition for both current and prospective members.
  • Continue to grow and retain membership. We celebrate our recent milestone of reaching 500 members! And, we welcome creative engagement of both new and veteran members to advance our mission.
  • Continue to define our core competencies. What does the TRUST do best, and how can we improve?
  • Create enduring relationships between the TRUST and our sponsors. Strong support of sponsors is a hallmark of our Forum and other events. We will continue to expand visibility of our sponsors and partners throughout the year.

I welcome engaging with current and prospective members, sponsors, and partners via the TRUST’s communication channels. Please visit our website as well as our LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter channels for more information about our inspiring and thought-provoking programs throughout the year.

Connie currently serves as TRUST President, and Professor and Dean at the School of Nursing at the University of Minnesota. Delaney holds degrees in nursing and mathematics, adult health nursing, educational administration, and informatics. Delaney’s work is expanding connections, collaborations, integrative informatics, and social structures which advance co-discovery of solutions that transform health and education systems.

Tags:  future of health care  women leaders  Women's Health Leadership TRUST 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
Page 1 of 3
1  |  2  |  3

Women's Health Leadership TRUST

1000 Westgate Drive, Ste. 252. • St. Paul, MN 55114
p. 651.366.6085 Email Us
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Linked In
  • Bebo